Why do I feel sick after scuba diving?

What are the side effects of scuba diving?

Diving does entail some risk. Not to frighten you, but these risks include decompression sickness (DCS, the “bends”), arterial air embolism, and of course drowning. There are also effects of diving, such as nitrogen narcosis, that can contribute to the cause of these problems.

Can you get sick from scuba diving?

Decompression sickness, also called generalized barotrauma or the bends, refers to injuries caused by a rapid decrease in the pressure that surrounds you, of either air or water. It occurs most commonly in scuba or deep-sea divers, although it also can occur during high-altitude or unpressurized air travel.

How long does decompression sickness last?

After several days of diving, a period of 12 to 24 hours (for example, 15 hours) at the surface is commonly recommended before flying or going to a higher altitude. People who have completely recovered from mild decompression sickness should refrain from diving for at least 2 weeks.

Does decompression sickness go away?

In some cases, symptoms may remain mild or even go away by themselves. Often, however, they strengthen in severity until you must seek medical attention, and they may have longer-term repercussions.

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What is the most common injury in scuba diving?

The most common injury in divers is ear barotrauma (Box 3-03). On descent, failure to equalize pressure changes within the middle ear space creates a pressure gradient across the eardrum.

Is scuba diving hard on your body?

Scuba diving exposes you to many effects, including immersion, cold, hyperbaric gases, elevated breathing pressure, exercise and stress, as well as a postdive risk of gas bubbles circulating in your blood. Your heart’s capacity to support an elevated blood output decreases with age and with disease.

What do the bends feel like?

The most common signs and symptoms of the bends include joint pains, fatigue, low back pain, paralysis or numbness of the legs, and weakness or numbness in the arms. Other associated signs and symptoms can include dizziness, confusion, vomiting, ringing in the ears, head or neck pain, and loss of consciousness.

Why do I get headaches after diving?

The carbon dioxide headache, one of the most common for divers, is caused by an increase in the body’s carbon dioxide level, which stimulates receptors in the brain’s blood vessels. An increase in the brain’s blood flow to these receptors leads to headaches.

How deep do you have to go to get decompression sickness?

Nitrogen narcosis symptoms tend to start once a diver reaches a depth of about 100 feet. They don’t get worse unless that diver swims deeper. Symptoms start to become more serious at a depth of about 300 feet. Once a diver returns to the water’s surface, the symptoms usually go away within a few minutes.

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How do you cure the bends?

The Bends Medical Treatment

  1. The diver will need high-flow oxygen and IV fluids. …
  2. The diver will likely need to go to a hyperbaric chamber for recompression. …
  3. Often the person is admitted to the hospital to monitor medical condition and to ensure that there is no recurrence of symptoms.

What is the most prominent symptom of decompression sickness?

Joint pain, the most common symptom from decompression sickness, can last for days or weeks.

Can I dive after decompression sickness?

After pain-only DCI without neurological symptoms, you can consider a return to diving after a minimum of two weeks. With minor neurological symptoms, consider returning after six weeks. If you had severe neurological symptoms or have any residual symptoms, you should not return to diving.