What safety precautions should a diver know during descent during ascent?

What happens when a diver descends?

As we’ve seen, as you descend on a dive, the increased pressure causes the volume of air in your lungs to decrease. But as this happens, the partial pressure of the air inside your lungs increases. This means that there is a greater concentration of oxygen and other gases in our lungs than there is in the blood.

What is one action that people scuba diving must always do to prevent injury during ascents to the surface?

Avoid pulling down on the reel line in an attempt to maintain your buoyancy. Use your BC for buoyancy control. Keep a bent, relaxed elbow when holding the line or reel. That way, you will maintain your depth and not be pulled up and down by possible wave action.

What is it called when you ascend too quickly while scuba diving?

Decompression sickness: Often called “the bends,” decompression sickness happens when a scuba diver ascends too quickly. Divers breathe compressed air that contains nitrogen. … But if a diver rises too quickly, the nitrogen forms bubbles in the body.

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Why must a scuba diver ascend slowly from a dive?

Nitrogen in a diver’s body will expand most quickly during the final ascent, and allowing his body additional time to eliminate this nitrogen will further reduce the diver’s risk of decompression sickness. … Divers should slowly ascend from all dives to avoid decompression sickness and AGE.

What would happen to a diver who does not exhale while surfacing from a 30 m dive?

What would happen to a diver who does not exhale while surfacing from a 30m dive? If divers must make emergency ascents from this depth they must remember to breathe out regularly as they return to the surface. If they don’t, the pressure of the air in their lungs will cause their lungs to expand.

Why can’t humans go deep underwater?

Since the water down at those depths is still liquid and not solid, there is not enough depth in our ocean to solidify water simply with pressure. Water remains a liquid at even 1101 bar or pressure. The human body would therefore not solidify under that pressure.

How fast should you ascend while diving?

You should never exceed an ascent rate of 10m/minute when diving shallower than about 30m. . An ascent rate of 5-6 metres per minute is recommended in the last 10m of ascent. Complete safety stops on all dives that exceed 10m depth. Safety stops assist with reduction of excess nitrogen, which reduces the risk of DCI.

What is a safety stop in diving?

A safety stop is a standard dive procedure that is done in scuba diving for any dives below 10 meters (32 feet) This brief 3 to 5-minute pause at a depth of 5-6 meters (15-20 foot) is a practice which allows a diver’s body to decompress after time spent at depth.

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How do you ascend properly?

So let us go over the most important steps you need to perform in order to ascend safely.

  1. Begin your ascent early. Remember, proper ascent takes time. …
  2. Agree with your buddy. …
  3. Lookup. …
  4. Monitor your ascent rate carefully. …
  5. Make safety stops. …
  6. Be extra careful during the final 20 feet (6 m) of ascent.

What is the most important rule in scuba diving?

If you remember one rule of scuba diving, make it this: Breathe continuously and never hold your breath. During open water certification, a scuba diver is taught that the most important rule in scuba diving is to breathe continuously and to avoid holding his breath underwater.

What is the golden rule of scuba diving?

Dive like your shadow, do not leave any trace and be a sensible part of the underwater world, not an alien. Never enter the water through reed, living corals or water plants. Control your buoyancy. Keep distance from corals and other animals and do not stir up sediment.

Why do divers exhale when surfacing?

As the diver ascends, the air in the lungs expands as surrounding water pressure decreases. Exhaling allows excess volume to escape from the lungs, and by exhaling at a suitable rate the diver can continue exhaling throughout the ascent and still have air in his or her lungs at the surface.